New Review on Audible.com for Dry Land – “Great Syfy Listen!”

Link

“Great Syfy Listen!!” – by Anne

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would to anyone who is a fan of this genre…this has it all for the true syfy fan!

What was one of the most memorable moments of Dry Land?

When he thought Colby was dead…Ted was so distraught!

Have you listened to any of Ian Sorensen’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not, but I would…he is very good!

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

This would be an interesting movie….

Any additional comments?

** I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review **

I am a huge Syfy fan..so this was right up my alley…Ted and a small crew of astronauts are sent to the moon to complete a mission to make it habitable…well things go wrong and they get stuck there….the twist is these are droid/human hybrids…such a unique and interesting story, and a great addition to the syfy genre….there is romance, and loss in this story…and it was a great quick listen…and I loved the little bonus story at the end!!! Thank You Audiobookblast(dot)com

Book Review – Novices by KM Herkes

BUY IT HERE

This is my second KM Herkes read, and I’m just about to delve into “Controlled Descent” involving the two characters in this book, Carl and Eddie. I really, really enjoyed this. The pacing is perfect, lots of worldbuilding and creation without being heavy handed. As with KM’s other works, she creates a fantastical world but paints it with a fine point brush instead of a spray painter. We’re brought into it as if it’s normalcy, as if it’s our own world and in that way we can live deeper in it. The story really picks up pace and keeps the reader turning the page, wanting more.

The world KM creates is not a perfect one, and it’s not supposed to be. Prejudices run high and it’s a slice of life of our own world, only put under a microscope. It’s a world of divisive lives, of fractured countries, and that’s what the Restoration is all about. I’m excited to get into the rest of this world, as I’ve already loved and lived in the “Extraordinary” world of KM’s other books. This story gave me a slice of life look into Carl and Eddie, and it has me wanting more. As a first foray into the Restoration, this is a great intro. I’d also think that those more familiar with the lives of Carl and Eddie will enjoy this pre-story of the two heroes as teenagers.

And now. I MUST READ Controlled Descent. It’s a moral imperative.

Dry Land Review and Author Interview by Cassie Sparks

I’ve had the pleasure and the honor to give an interview to Cassie over at BoyMomLovesBooks, and she’s listened to and reviewed my book and Ian’s performance in Dry Land. Check it out… and check out the GIVEAWAY! You may win a copy of Dry Land on audio or a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

http://boymomlovesbooks.blogspot.com/2015/07/spotlightjennifer-seidler-giveaway.html?spref=tw

Audiobook Review – “Artemis Rising” by Cheri Lasota

Artemis Rising – click to buy

4 STARS

Utterly atmospheric. A story woven from the golden threads of myth and mastery.

I didn’t know what to expect when I first started listening to Artemis Rising. It’s not normally a book I would have chosen, it being a YA romance, but I’m glad I did. I loved the historical aspect of this. While the story itself was abstract, almost floating above reality in a sense, fantasy and fantastical, the setting did the plot justice. The Azores are exotic and new to most, full of lush landscapes and open seas, the Portuguese language foreign to most ears. The time was right, as well, the late 1800’s when the world blossomed out, as did the world’s women from the ties of oppression – just like Ava in this tale.

Keeping the story ethereal were the intricate threads of the myths – those of Arethusa and Alpheus and Tristan and Isolde. Now, I wondered, how in the hooey is Cheri going to wend these two unrelated and vastly different myths together, but dang it… she did. I wondered, in a way, while listening to this, why Ava/Arethusa allowed herself to be so tied down to the myths? Why, in turn did Tristao? To me, it was the parental influence trickling down into the children themselves… and then when the children came into their own minds and their own lives it made sense. Much of it was more figurative and symbolic than realistic, and that was just fine with me. It was almost as if Artemis Rising was a new myth, a new tale to be told by the firesides and hearths.

I’ve read other reviews that discuss Ava/Arethusa making her choice between Paganism and Christianity, but I honestly don’t think that’s what it was. Her choice is between allowing external forces to control her life and her destiny, and taking her course in her own hands. I loved the use of name choices in this story, and while an abstract thought, the name truly defined each character, and that was a masterful stroke.

I enjoyed listening to this book but I think I may have enjoyed reading it more, and I may just do that. The narrator’s voice, while lilting, fine, and beautiful, almost song-like, was sometimes heavy handed, too high-pitched or strange in intonation, inflection and diction. I had to go back to the text sometimes to figure out what she was saying with certain words such as Marques. Granted, much of that was my lack of familiarity with the Portuguese language, so I take that bit of blame. I think, however, that the narration was right for the story. It was at times like listening to a mother or a beloved teacher reading to me, and given the poetic, beautiful language of this book, I think that makes sense, and it is a good fit.

Bottom line, I was entranced by the story. I was heartbroken, frightened, on the edge of my seat, and I felt all of the anger, fear, irritation and love right along with Arethusa. And I may have fallen a little bit in love with Tristao. 🙂 I would recommend this to a friend, and in fact, I have. I received the audio book for free, but I intend to buy a Kindle copy so I can revisit it whenever I like.

New Review of the Dry Land Audio on Amazon and Audible from Cassandra S.

4.0 out of 5 stars A solid 4 STARS, June 23, 2015
This review is from: Dry Land (Kindle Edition)
*I received this in exchange for an honest review
This type of book was sort of new for me…the Artificial Intelligence/Robotic type of character, but I found that I enjoyed it. Having some of the characters having that type of characteristics, thrown in with regular humans, and trying to find a way of expansion for Earth on the Moon. Now we all know that the Moon is so extremely important to the balance of the oceans, but obviously not all of the characters take this into consideration in this book.
It was an enjoyable book with a new look on things. The narrator did well and had great accents. I would definitely recommend this book to others and give it a solid 4 STARS.

The Martian by Andy Weir – Audiobook review

Before I decided to read (erm, listen to) this book, I read the reviews. Just like you’re reading this one. I read comments comparing The Martian to “MacGyver in space,” and complaints about the dry nature of the SCIENCE, and complaints that said science was not accurate or problematic or the like.

But listen. I did not care about any of that once I met Mark Watney.

Watney is likable. He’s funny. He’s wicked in a good way, and he’s clever as hell. He’s erudite yet a bit of a party boy, serious in the obvious situations when he needs to be. Which is often. And you feel for his situation. You hate those damn potatoes just as much as he does (no spoilers but yeah potatoes, folks!), and as he leaves his logs and babbles on about the science of the things he does to try and get himself out of his Martian predicament, I found myself understanding his thought processes. I understood the ideas and the simple genius behind some of it, in spite of the technobabble and the instant calculations. The thing that others have criticized, I thoroughly enjoyed.

In a way, Watney’s voice reminded me of Dan Brown’s Robert Langdon, but in a much more personable way. I know the very idea of Robert Langdon or Dan Brown is a turn off for many, but hear me out. Watney is highly intelligent, and his intelligence comes through in his explanations of things, like Langdon. But unlike Langdon, his mind shines even more through his choices, his decisions — which, again, unlike Robert Langdon, his speeches do not preach at the reader. They do not fill the reader’s head with useless facts. Watney does not simply lecture for lecturing’s sake. Everything Watney tells us about his thoughts and calculations and machinations moves the story along.

As for the action, while there are no real true edge of your seat hold onto your hats moments, there are a few hiccups along Watney’s way. But, I can’t help but wonder if that makes the story more realistic.

The characters aren’t as in depth as other stories, but again, this is Watney’s story. Yet, you learn a lot about the crew of his ship, about the folks down on Terra Firma who work tirelessly and endlessly to bring him home, and the effort to do so is gargantuan. It leaves you with a sense of satisfaction in humanity, that it is human nature to root for the underdog, to give the fellow man in trouble a helping hand. And oh boy, did the World give Watney a massive one.

Overall, this to me was very enjoyable. I looked forward to getting into my car every day and listening to the excellent narration by R.C. Bray — hearing what sort of challenges Watney would face when I met him again every morning on the way to work and every evening on my way home. Watney was excellent company, and I was delighted to hear his story. When I finished the audiobook, I told my husband that we HAVE to see the film when it comes out.

Available at Audible. com