New Review of Dry Land on Amazon.com

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic! 5 stars all the way for me, July 19, 2015
This review is from: Dry Land (Audible Audio Edition)
Exceptional. As I listened to the audiobook version of Dry Land, that was the word that kept coming to mind. I was sucked in from the first paragraph, and my love for the main character grew and grew. Ted, or “Shakespeare,” as he’s affectionately called in this story is humble, hilarious, and a true hero. I’m also listening to Hugh Howey’s Wool right now, and while the stories are vastly different, I found myself thinking Dry Land is most definitely in the same caliber of craft and story as Wool. I recommend this book to fans of scifi, no matter the sub-genre you usually read in.

The level of detail, the characterization, the plot reversals in the story that made me shout out loud “Oh, no you didn’t!”–all of it was exceptionally well done. The way the author wove the themes and symbolism throughout the story and brought them around full circle in the ending scene was a master stroke of genius. I plan to read anything Jenn Seidler has written or will write in the future. I know I’ll be in good writerly hands and be in for one hell of a ride!

The narrator, Ian Sorensen, totally had me guessing whether he is American or British. He switched between multiple voices effortlessly, and he was all around fantastic to listen to. I’ll also look up his other titles. He’s that’s good.

Bottom line: if you like scifi–or even if you don’t usually!–I strongly recommend that you give Dry Land a whirl. Bloody brilliant stuff.

BLOG TAKEOVER: Author Cheri Lasota – The Paradisi Chronicles

From Cheri lasota:

Massive Multi-Author Book Launch coming September 1!

ENTER THE PARADISI WORLD…

A science fiction adventure through time, space and generations, brought to life through the creativity and independent perspectives of multiple authors. Enter the world of the Paradisi Chronicles, where every new journey is a surprise ride you’ll never want to get off.

Astronaut in the tunnels

What is the Paradisi Chronicles?

Deep Space

When Author Hugh Howey put out the challenge in 2014 for writers to band together to write in the same universe, our group of seven authors took up the challenge. We spent a year building out a fictional planetary system, complete with a massive world narrative with multiple peoples, languages, and storylines as well as detailed maps and a large amount of research into advances in Space Elevator, EmDrive, Ford-Svaiter Mirror, and spaceship technologies.

In addition, we came together with a clear goal: the Paradisi Project is an open-source world, meaning any author who wishes to join in may write any story they wish. Thus far, we have written in a variety of genres: YA romance, a contemporary romance, two action-adventures, a coming-of-age action-adventure, and two near-future scifi novells on offer coming up September 1.

And so it begins…

In the last decades of the twenty-first century, ten wealthy men and women, seeking to escape the increasingly devastated Earth, focus all their power and wealth on developing the technology and building the spaceships that will allow a select few to leave Earth and colonize the world they call New Eden. Here, on their new home in the Paradisi Planetary System, these Founding Families hope to avoid the environmental and political mistakes that were destroying Earth. But they find that the world they claim for their own is already inhabited, and the Ddaeran, the original inhabitants, although human-like in their appearance, possess abilities that the Founders and their Descendants will find both intriguing and frightening.

Paradisi Escape

Book 1, Paradisi Exodus Novella Series

Paradisi EscapeMy novella series, Paradisi Exodus, details the origin story of the Paradisi Chronicles. I adore origin stories in general–hello every superhero origin story! =) While researching another scifi series I’m writing, I got obsessed with space elevators and realized I could add that technology to the world of Paradisi. Much of the tech in Paradisi originated with my various geeky obsessions with astronomy and near-future tech. Mea Culpa!

Here’s a bit about the story that kicks off my series:

In near future 2094, Earth is on the brink of nuclear winter. A secret evacuation is already underway, and Solomon Reach and his crew have guaranteed passage on the last starship to leave for colonization and exploration of a new planet in a distant galaxy. When Solomon learns of a betrayal that will have catastrophic consequences, he is faced with an impossible choice: who will live and who will die?

Coming soon!

Subscribe to our blog at the link in the footer below to receive news of our imminent book launch on September 1. We can’t wait to share our shiny new world with you. In the meantime check out the rest of our website where you can learn more about the world and all our stories. Thank you for the challenge, Hugh Howey. We accept!

Books | Authors | The World Want to write in our world?


About the Author

Cheri Lasota writing as Tristan James

Author Tristan JamesAudavoxx.com Founder Cheri Lasota has been a freelance author, editor, ebook designer and marketing consultant for over a decade, Cheri has dedicated her life and career to helping authors succeed in publishing. Her bestselling debut novel, Artemis Rising, is a 2013 Cygnus Awards First Place Winner and a 2012 finalist in the Next Generation Indie Books Awards. Echoes in the Glass is her second novel.

She is currently writing a scifi trilogy and a fantasy series. Cheri’s Paradisi Chronicles novella series is written under the pen name Tristan James.

Audiobook Review – “Artemis Rising” by Cheri Lasota

Artemis Rising – click to buy

4 STARS

Utterly atmospheric. A story woven from the golden threads of myth and mastery.

I didn’t know what to expect when I first started listening to Artemis Rising. It’s not normally a book I would have chosen, it being a YA romance, but I’m glad I did. I loved the historical aspect of this. While the story itself was abstract, almost floating above reality in a sense, fantasy and fantastical, the setting did the plot justice. The Azores are exotic and new to most, full of lush landscapes and open seas, the Portuguese language foreign to most ears. The time was right, as well, the late 1800’s when the world blossomed out, as did the world’s women from the ties of oppression – just like Ava in this tale.

Keeping the story ethereal were the intricate threads of the myths – those of Arethusa and Alpheus and Tristan and Isolde. Now, I wondered, how in the hooey is Cheri going to wend these two unrelated and vastly different myths together, but dang it… she did. I wondered, in a way, while listening to this, why Ava/Arethusa allowed herself to be so tied down to the myths? Why, in turn did Tristao? To me, it was the parental influence trickling down into the children themselves… and then when the children came into their own minds and their own lives it made sense. Much of it was more figurative and symbolic than realistic, and that was just fine with me. It was almost as if Artemis Rising was a new myth, a new tale to be told by the firesides and hearths.

I’ve read other reviews that discuss Ava/Arethusa making her choice between Paganism and Christianity, but I honestly don’t think that’s what it was. Her choice is between allowing external forces to control her life and her destiny, and taking her course in her own hands. I loved the use of name choices in this story, and while an abstract thought, the name truly defined each character, and that was a masterful stroke.

I enjoyed listening to this book but I think I may have enjoyed reading it more, and I may just do that. The narrator’s voice, while lilting, fine, and beautiful, almost song-like, was sometimes heavy handed, too high-pitched or strange in intonation, inflection and diction. I had to go back to the text sometimes to figure out what she was saying with certain words such as Marques. Granted, much of that was my lack of familiarity with the Portuguese language, so I take that bit of blame. I think, however, that the narration was right for the story. It was at times like listening to a mother or a beloved teacher reading to me, and given the poetic, beautiful language of this book, I think that makes sense, and it is a good fit.

Bottom line, I was entranced by the story. I was heartbroken, frightened, on the edge of my seat, and I felt all of the anger, fear, irritation and love right along with Arethusa. And I may have fallen a little bit in love with Tristao. 🙂 I would recommend this to a friend, and in fact, I have. I received the audio book for free, but I intend to buy a Kindle copy so I can revisit it whenever I like.